Things they don’t tell you about a C-section

Things they don’t tell you about a C-section

*Things they don’t tell you about a c section*⠀⠀
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1. There will be blood⠀⠀
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You may think that by having a C section you get to avoid some of the nasties (such as post birth bleeding.) Unfortunately, this isn’t the case. Even though you haven’t given birth via your nether regions, everything that was inside you when you were pregnant (blood, mucus and uterine tissue) needs to come out. So for the next 6 weeks you will be wearing sanitary towels. Another word of warning – the blood can be quite heavy so don’t freak out when you have that first trip to the loo. It’s completely normal.⠀⠀
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2. People will still look at your bits⠀⠀
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As I said above, you will bleed after a C section. And when you bleed, nurses want to check it (to make sure that everything is all ok and normal.) So, throughout my stay in hospital, every couple of hours a nurse would poke her head around the door and ask to look in my knickers. ⠀⠀
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3. You’ll get the shakes⠀⠀
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After I had Rupert I was taken to the recovery room and started shaking uncontrollably. Not in a horrible, scary way, but more in a ‘why am I shaking, ha ha” way. The reason for this, I was assured by the midwives, was that when you have a spinal block, your temperature can drop and immediately after surgery you will feel very cold and get the shakes. Thankfully the midwives are there to wrap you up in lovely warm blankets (and you are so fascinated by the little bundle of joy you are holding that you don’t really even notice!)⠀⠀
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4. Your incision will be numb for a long time⠀
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Again – entirely normal but it can freak you out the first time you touch your scar and realise you can’t feel a thing.⠀
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5. It take a while to be sewn up⠀⠀
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Rupert was born within 5 minutes of the surgery starting, but the sewing up took nearly 45 minutes. I’ve been assured this is the case for most C sections.⠀⠀
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6. You might have to inject yourself⠀⠀
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Once you have your C section you have to inject yourself with blood thinner for the next 5/6 days. When you are in the hospital the nurses will do this for you (it’s a quick and painless stab in the upper thigh) but when you get home you have to do it yourself.

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